Unstructured Play Supports Brain Development

“Recent research suggests that children should experience twice as much unstructured time as structured play experiences. Lia Karsten, a professor of urban geographies at the University of Amsterdam, argues that this change has transformed children from active participants to “backseat children” who are passively escorted from one structured activity to the next by their parents. The tension between a parent’s desire for control and a child’s desire for freedom has been playing out for thousands of years, but today’s parents seem to be gripping a bit tighter than any time in the recent past.” – Michael Patte, Ph.D
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Unstructured play is medicine for the imagination! And the processes of play are building key skills for later in life. Here are three strategies to incorporate unstructured play into your busy, daily routines!
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🥳If you find that you’re running back and forth from activity to activity, or having your children be passive in what activities you do as a family or with friends, try supporting them to make an idea of what to play with.
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🥳For younger children, let your child take the lead and follow along with their play scheme.
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🥳Set up the environment for successful unstructured play, make it safe, provide some starter toys & hold back from pushing your ideas on them.